A Raspberry Pi and Arduino-Powered Dart Board Digital Scoring Display

We’re not saying that you’re the next Phil ‘The Power’ Taylor, but there’s a good chance you like a game of darts. Hasn’t the lack of a decent digital display proved a problem, in a world of oft-disappearing chunks of chalk?

Or do you rely on a whiteboard with those weird stinky pens that work better than the beer? Whatever the case, there’s no need to fret about the lack of chalk, stinky pens, or even a pen and paper. Forget about looking on wistfully at the latest digital signage in your social club. With a Raspberry Pi and Arduino-powered digital scoring display, you can stay on top of the score, simply by pressing a couple of buttons.

This project was built by a pair of brothers and features arcade machine buttons as a keyboard (with an Arduino Leonardo holding it all together) for updating the score. Meanwhile, a Raspberry Pi outputs the score on a web page, displayed in Chromium, to an LCD display.

Unfortunately, no code appears to have been released for this project yet, so a certain amount of guesswork will be required on your part. Fortunately, there is a detailed imgur page that outlines the hardware side of the build, and peaks at some of the code.

We think you’ll agree that the completed build looks very impressive. It’s a polished approach, with a smart black finish and corkboard backdrop. While the Imgur page notes that the brothers “Still need to add a speaker, previous throw score, and throwing averages,” it’s arguable that this build needs something else ... just in case someone who can’t throw a dart to save their life (hi!) misthrows and pierces the LCD display.

Our money is on a piece of Gorilla Glass to cover the display, protecting it from damage. What do you think? How long before we see a Pi and Arduino-powered snooker scoreboard ... or even cricket scoring?


Christian Cawley

Christian Cawley spends a lot of time with Raspberry Pis and scours the web looking for interesting DIY electronics projects and news for ElectroMaker. He's currently trying to show his 7 year old son how to get to grips with Scratch, but so far to no avail.


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