What We Saw at the CRL Accelerator Demo Day

Ever wondered how tech startups find money? What puts a kid with a Raspberry Pi, a great idea, and a working prototype in touch with investors and partners?

Well increasingly, it’s events like the CRL Accelerator Demo Day, where approved projects are invited to pitch for support from experts, potential investors, even finding a co-founder. These events also provide an opportunity for an audience that also includes enthusiasts and fellow entrepreneurs to see what the future may bring.

Taking place on Thursday, January 25th at the offices of U+I in London, the most recent CRL Accelerator Demo Day saw a number of projects with radically different potential audiences. What did ElectroMaker make of it?

 

The Bright Sign Glove

 

Whether you’re deaf, have a child or loved one who is hearing impaired, communicating with (or learning) sign language can be difficult. It’s even harder if you’re trying to communicate with a hearing person who is unfamiliar with signing. The Bright Sign Glove is an excellent solution to this problem, translating the motion and shapes of sign language into speech.

Here’s a closer look at it:

It’s potentially the greatest implementation of wearable tech we’ve seen and has massive implications if it gets the backing it clearly needs. Find out more about this amazing project, lead by founder Hadeel Ayoub, at BrightSignGlove.com

 

Tonik Instrument Augmentation

 

Electronic musicians have an image problem. Despite having massive followings, and in some cases big hits, there is the underlying issue that many people think that when it comes to playing live, all these performers do is click “play”. Even when they don’t, that’s often how it looks anyway.

 

Tonik’s game plan is to overcome that problem, offering mass-produced, affordable solutions. One such example is the Pulse, a sort of effects pedal for acoustic guitars, which is neither a pedal (it’s mounted on the bridge) and requires no amplification. Adding reverb and other natural effects, the cable-free Pulse uses the sound hole of the acoustic guitar to amplifying the effects.

 

Find out more at toniksound.com.

 

Make Some Noise with Oddball

 

Finally, we were also impressed by Oddball, an affordable bouncing ball percussion device. Here’s the presentation, by Nathan and Pasquale. 

 

Working to Iggy Pop’s philosophy that music should be “fun – that’s why we call it playing,” Oddball – aimed at 13-18-year-olds – is described by Pasquale as “a drum machine, crammed into a ball.” With a mobile app controlling what voice the Oddball outputs (it might be a snare, or a bass), the ball can then be used to loop and record, building up beats and rhythms, and even works in conjunction with other Oddballs. Via the app, an Oddball community can be accessed to share your beats with.

 

Take a look at Oddball in action:

 

If you’re interested, you can sign up for updates at www.oddballing.com.

 

Want to find out more about the CRL Accelerator Demo Day? Check the ElectroMaker YouTube channel for more clips, of this, and other events. 

 


Christian Cawley

Christian Cawley spends a lot of time with Raspberry Pis and scours the web looking for interesting DIY electronics projects and news for ElectroMaker. He's currently trying to show his 7 year old son how to get to grips with Scratch, but so far to no avail.


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